Risk Factors for Hypertension

Introduction

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus that can cause genital warts and cancer. There are more than 100 different strains of HPV, and some types are known to cause cervical cancer in women. The good news is that the HPV vaccine can protect against cancers caused by certain strains of this highly communicable virus.

HPV is the most common STD in the U.S.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HPV is the most common STD in the United States. It’s spread through skin-to-skin contact. The human papillomavirus can be transmitted during any type of sexual activity, including vaginal, anal and oral sex.

The CDC also notes that it’s possible for an infected partner to pass the virus onto another person even if no symptoms are present. In fact, according to Planned Parenthood, one in four people will have HPV at some point in their lives—and not all strains of the virus cause cancer!

Although there is no cure for HPV itself, you can use condoms or dental dams during all forms of intimate contact with your partner(s) as a preventative measure against spreading or contracting it yourself.

HPV is spread through skin-to-skin contact, including vaginal, anal and oral sex.

HPV is spread through skin-to-skin contact, including vaginal, anal and oral sex. It can also be transmitted to the mouth by sharing toothbrushes or razors.

The CDC says there are more than 40 types of HPV that can infect the genital areas of males and females. These types can also infect areas such as the anus, groin and thighs.

HPV has been linked to cervical cancer in women and throat cancer in men—but it’s unclear whether HPV causes these cancers, since they’re relatively rare compared with other causes like smoking or excessive drinking (and plenty of people who have had oral sex don’t develop mouth cancer). In fact, some studies suggest that getting infected with certain high-risk strains may actually protect against some other types of cancer later on—though this hasn’t been proven yet either way

HPV infection is usually asymptomatic.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with HPV, you may be wondering what to expect. For example, will your symptoms resolve on their own? Will they be long-lasting? And how do you know when it’s time to see a doctor?

What are the signs and symptoms of anogenital HPV infection?

HPV is often asymptomatic (without symptoms) in men. Men with HPV can also have genital warts that appear during or after puberty if they don’t use condoms consistently during sex. The most common sign of anogenital cancer caused by HPV is abnormal cell growth in the cervix or vulva (the external female genitalia), but there may not be any visible signs of disease at first. The following table compares common anogenital HPV manifestations between women and men:

Most people who contract HPV heal on their own within two years, but sometimes the virus remains dormant for years or even decades before it manifests itself as a disease, like genital warts or cancer.

HPV causes warts, or papillomas. These are benign skin tumors that appear on your genitals, anus, mouth and throat. They can be flat or cauliflower-like. Warts can also form in other areas such as the hands and feet but they tend to be more common in moist areas like the underarms or groin area.

HPV is spread through skin-to-skin contact; it cannot be transmitted via sharing cups or eating utensils with someone who has HPV because it doesn’t live long outside of a human host. However, if you do touch another person’s wart while they have one and then you touch yourself (or your partner), the virus may spread to that part of your body too!

HPV can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus and back of the throat.

You may be wondering if HPV can cause cancer. The answer is yes, it can. HPV can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis and anus as well as the back of throat (oropharynx).

Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. In fact, it is estimated that there will be more than 500,000 new cases this year alone and roughly 70% will occur in developing countries where cervical cancer screening programs are limited or non-existent.

Most cases of anogenital cancers are caused by HPV infection.

Most cases of anogenital cancers are caused by HPV infection. The virus is spread through skin-to-skin contact, including vaginal, anal and oral sex.

When a person contracts the virus and has no symptoms, it’s called an “asymptomatic carrier.” The risk of developing cancer increases as the number of sexual partners increases over a lifetime.

Regular Pap tests and cervical exams may prevent cervical cancer by identifying abnormal cells early and allowing them to be treated effectively.

  • Pap tests and cervical exams may prevent cervical cancer by identifying abnormal cells early and allowing them to be treated effectively.
  • Papanicolaou (Pap) tests are used to detect changes in the cells on a woman’s cervix, which can help doctors find abnormal cell growth that can lead to cancer. The test involves sampling cells from your cervix for examination in a lab.
  • A pelvic exam is an internal check of your reproductive organs, including the vagina, uterus (or womb), ovaries and fallopian tubes. It also includes examining the structure of the rectum if you have any concerns about bowel problems that could affect fertility or cancer risk factors such as HPV infection or polyps.

Pap tests can catch cervical cell changes caused by the HPV virus early enough so that pre-cancerous lesions can be treated before they develop into cancer.

Pap tests can catch cervical cell changes caused by the HPV virus early enough so that pre-cancerous lesions can be treated before they develop into cancer. Cancer-causing strains of HPV can be prevented through regular screening and vaccination.

There are two vaccines approved in the United States to protect against some types of cancer-causing strains of HPV — Gardasil 9 and Cervarix.

There are two vaccines approved in the United States to protect against some types of cancer-causing strains of HPV — Gardasil 9 and Cervarix. They’re both given in a 3-dose series (though some people will need a second dose if they didn’t get it right after their first dose).

Gardasil 9 is the only HPV vaccine available in the United States. It protects against nine types of HPV that cause cancers:

  • HPV 6/11 – these two strains together cause 99 percent of genital warts cases, according to Merck’s website.

The CDC recommends vaccination for children between ages 11 and 12; adults age 26 or younger who have not yet started receiving vaccinations should get two doses six to 12 months apart; people with weakened immune systems or those diagnosed with HIV may need a third dose.

The CDC recommends vaccination for children between ages 11 and 12; adults age 26 or younger who have not yet started receiving vaccinations should get two doses six to 12 months apart; people with weakened immune systems or those diagnosed with HIV may need a third dose.

If you are over the age of 26, you can still get the HPV vaccine if you haven’t gotten it already, but it won’t protect against all strains of the virus.

The vaccine is recommended by doctors as well as most health insurance providers such as Blue Cross Blue Shield and Cigna. You can find more information about whether your insurance covers the cost on their websites — just search “HPV.”

Cancer-causing strains of HPV can be prevented through regular screening and vaccination.

Even though HPV can cause cancer, you are still at risk for developing the disease if you have this infection. The most common way that HPV is spread is through skin-to-skin contact, but it’s possible to contract the virus even if there is no physical contact between you and another person.

For example:

  • Even if someone doesn’t touch your genitals directly with their hands or mouth, if they’re touching themselves while sitting on a chair that also happens to be touching your shoulder — or vice versa — then they could pass along the virus through this indirect means.
  • If one partner has an open sore (such as from shaving), it might be possible for an open wound on another person’s body (or vice versa) to transfer HPV just by coming into contact with each other’s skin!

If you have had multiple sexual partners over time without using protection like condoms, then it’s more likely than not that both of you will have been exposed to one another’s bodily fluids and therefore contracted one or more STDs like genital warts (HPV).

Conclusion

HPV is the most common STD in the U.S., so it’s important to inform yourself about how you can protect yourself against this virus and its effects. If you’re sexually active, get tested for both HPV and HIV regularly — or even better, get vaccinated! You can also lower your risk by using a condom every time you have intercourse with someone who may be infected with HPV.